Can my Charge be expunged?

Have you been denied employment and/or housing because of a background check? Have you been turned away by your child’s school as a volunteer because you have something on your record? We all make mistakes, but those mistakes do not need to follow you around for the rest of your life.

In some criminal cases, the court has the authority to seal all government held records of criminal cases, which is sometimes referred to as a “full expungement.” This means that a court can issue an order to seal court records and records at the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, police departments, corrections and other agencies.

This means that the charge will disappear forever. No employer or apartment will ever know it took place.

The list for expungement includes:

-some first time drug possession offenses resolved under certain laws;
-offenses committed by juveniles who were prosecuted in adult criminal court;
-cases that were resolved in your favor (i.e., you were found not guilty or the case was dismissed); and
-some other convictions.

Convictions for petty misdemeanors, misdemeanors, and gross misdemeanors may be eligible for full expungement depending on:

-what crime you were convicted of;
-how much time has passed since your sentence was discharged; and
-other cases that are on your criminal history.

If you want to get that criminal record cleared, it can be a very smooth process and at this time done via video. Some might even qualify for a waiver of the filing fee which can really help. From trespassing, theft, assault and armed robbery, you may be eligible for expungement.

And don’t think you don’t qualify because you already looked into it. Minnesota passed a new expungement law in 2015 that greatly expanded what the Court can expunge. There has also been new case law that has fleshed out some of the grey area of the law. If you have questions or are interested in discussing possible expungement, feel free to call me at 651-705-9098 or email me at mark@perronlawoffice.com. Consultations are free and confidential.

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